2/8/22 Free Ebook “8 Valentine-Themed Tabletop Games for Date Night”

Book Cover Image Credit: harpercollins.com

Here’s a fun game I created, similar to my Christmas Cookies game over here. Get ready to play it for Valentine’s Day! This is one of the games I have included in the PDF download linked way down at the bottom of this post, “8 Valentine-Themed Tabletop Games.”

First, if you can, get the picture book Sugar Cookies: Bite-sized Lessons in Love by Amy Krouse Rosenthal from your local public library. If not, no worries! You can listen to it being read aloud here in YouTube.

It would be so totally fun to have a plate of sugar cookies on the center of the table. (Find out ahead of time if any guests are sugar-free or gluten-free and prepare accordingly. I’ve got a gluten free sugar cookie recipe linked over here.)

Pass out pen or pencil to everyone and stacks of identical sizes of paper, like 8 ½ x 11 cut into fourths.

Read the book the whole way through to the group, or listen to it on YouTube (link above). 

Have everyone write down one word that relates to love and/or Valentine’s Day. It could be a positive emotion, or an adjective, verb, or adverb. Words like the following:

Desire

Darling

Honor

Respect

Reciprocate

Adorable

Sweetly

Lovely

Softly

Valentine 

Serve

Romantic

Everlasting Love

Precious

Affectionately

Commitment

Cutely

 Go ahead and use these words if people are having a hard time thinking of words on their own.

Person whose name starts with the closest letter to the letter “L” starts first as the first judge. The judge announces his word. Everyone now defines that word, just like in the book, in terms of cookies, by writing his/definition on a piece of paper.  That means each player uses the word “cookie” in the definition. He or she writes, “Respect  means….(with the person’s answer using the word ‘cookie.’ )”

So, for example, in the book, the first word explained in terms of cookies was “endearment.” 

“Endearment means ‘Come here, my sugar, my cookie, my sweet little morsel!’

The next example in the book is  “considerate.” “Considerate means I waited until you came home until I licked the dough so we could do it together.” 

So you can see that you can use the word cookie figuratively or literally in your definition, as long as you use the word.

This was my first attempt at making gluten-free sugar cookies. Recipe is linked below.

Each player turns his/her paper to the judge after writing his/her definition on the paper. The judge reads the papers out loud and picks the best one. The judge turns his paper with the word on it to the winning player to use a point awarded. First player to get to a predetermined point value wins, such as 3, 5, 10, depending on the size and attention/engagement of the group. Or play until everyone has had a turn to be the judge with the winner being the one with the most points. 

Alternate way to play: Instead of being the judge, the judge is the host and reads aloud each answer and each player guesses who said what answer. Keep score on a piece of paper with each correct guess worth one point and play to a predetermined point value. 

Enjoy eating the sugar cookies at the end of the game! If you want more Valentine’s Day game ideas, check out my FREE ebook linked below.

My cookies never look as good as those on food blogs but they are still yummy!
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